Using Mind Maps in Testing

Mind maps are an excellent tool and can be used in a variety of testing activities like requirements analysis, test design, test planning, session reports, measuring test coverage etc. Testing relies heavily on communicating stories about what should be tested, how it should be tested, what are the risky areas and so on. Making this process visual can help testing teams articulate their thoughts & ideas better. Drawing mind maps also makes generating new ideas much easier.

Take a look at the simple “Replace” dialogue box below

Dialogue Box

We can easily create a mind map for testing this functionality using the following steps:

  1. Draw the main theme in the centre.
  2. Draw the module name/features of the application branching out from the main theme.
  3. Draw the sub module/feature branching out from each module/feature.
  4. Add colors to your mind map to make it easier for your brain to group things together.
  5. Write test cases for each feature and sub feature.
  6. Include only testable items in your mind map
  7. Try not to use full sentences in your mind map

Mind Map 1

Some examples for creating exclusive mind maps or creating branches in existing mind maps are:

  • Mind maps for field level validation of all fields on the screen
  • Identify fields that are common to all screens and create a ‘Common Fields’ mind map. Eg. Date Field- this field is the same in all screens
  • Mind maps that include business rules
  • Mind maps for events like Mouse Over, Click etc
  • Mind maps based on Screen Names
  • Mind maps based on Functionality

An example Mind Map for validating a subscription form

Subscription Form Mind Map

Ideas for using mind maps in testing:

  • Mind Map Jamming: All the testing team members read /analyze a particular requirement/feature and create a mind map for it together.
  • Using Mind Maps for Defect/ Execution Summary: Create a mind map of test cases. After execution, you can mark (tick or cross) the mind map as per the Actual Result, thus using it to provide Defect/Execution Summary.
  •  Smoke/Sanity Testing: Create a mind map for all the flows that are to be Smoke tested or Sanity tested.
  • Scope: Create a mind map to show what is in Scope and what is not in Scope.

You can use mind maps anywhere and everywhere! Mind maps exist to make your life easy, so if a mind map is getting too big or complicated try splitting it.  The great thing about mind maps is that all test cases are visible in one view; you don’t need to scroll up and down. This also makes it simpler to add new points whenever you want. Mind maps provide more coverage and the likelihood of missing important points is lesser. You cannot use long detailed sentences in mind maps. Using one word per line improves clarity and understanding. It makes recollection easier. Using single keywords will make your mind maps more powerful and flexible.

 Mindmap testing-final

Mind mapping skills improve over time and with practice your mind maps will become more extensive & wide-ranging. Although, mind maps help you simplify information and make it easily understandable, you must not forget that they are ultimately models and therefore, they may leave out important aspects. So make sure that you question what might be missing from the map and add those things. This is quite simple as all you have to do is add another node to the map!

Satish Tilokchandani | Lead Consultant | Zen Test Labs

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