8 Steps to Improve Your Regression Testing Process

With business and user requirements perpetually in an evolutionary mode, I find that regression testing has become a key component of the software development lifecycle. As testers, we need to keep in mind that a constant change in the functionality of the application lends the system to vulnerabilities in the base functionality too. These vulnerabilities tend to creep in due to an oversight while adding new functionality, poor analysis of impact on interfacing/ integrating applications and many a times due to the fact that customizations are an unknown entity. Poor regression testing can not only result in poor software quality but also impact revenue and cause customer loss.
Based on many years of planning, creating and executing the Quality Assurance programs of multiple Fortune 500 companies, I suggest the following eight step methodology to improve any regression testing process.

Phase 1: Defining
Step 1: Objective Finding (OF) – Challenges and Goal Identification
This step answers one of the most important questions “Why is regression testing not effective in its current state?”

Step 2: Fact Finding (FF) – Data Collation and Analysis
During this stage, teams must trail defects found in the past to conduct a defect root cause analysis. An important part of this step is bug prediction analysis so that defect prone areas in the application can be found.

Step 3: Problem Finding (PF) – Problem Clarification and Statement
Once the results of Steps 1 and 2 are combined, the exact scope of the challenges to address is established. These refined objectives act as the equivalent of a “Requirements Document”.

Phase 2- Scoping
Step 4: Test Cases Finding (TF) –Coverage Gap Analysis
Gaps in test coverage are found based on the current test cases and the application functionality. Techniques to map test cases to requirements and testing techniques are used to identify missing test cases

Step 5: Test Case Centralization (TC) – Test Case Repository Creation
Ensure that all test cases are stored in a centralized repository and in an optimized manner. Each test case must have a clear objective, precondition, steps, expected result and test data.

Step 6 : Test Case Optimization (TO) – Maximum Coverage in Desired Time with Minimum Risk
Statistical techniques such as Classification Tree and Orthogonal Array may be used to run minimum number of test cases in a way where every business process/ function is covered at least once

Phase 3- Executing
Step 7: Reusing Test Components (RT) – A Modular Approach
Create business functions and test data in a way that they can be reused for building manual test cases. Automate the generation of descriptive manual test cases.

Step 8: Test Case Classification (TC) – Test Case Mapping
At this stage, test cases are grouped requirement wise, screen wise, module wise, etc. Small frequently used regression pack/suites are created.

We have written a detailed whitepaper ‘Progress Not Regress’ on improving any regression testing process. We would love to hear your thoughts on it!

Girish Nair | Sr. Consultant | Zen Test Labs

Reducing dependence on automation engineers to manage test automation!

I have always wondered what would it be to separate test automation and automation engineers. Considering that Test Automation has always been treated as the holy grail of testing! Enterprises that have managed to achieve high levels of automation in the testing process have enhanced productivity exponentially while improving coverage and thus reducing risk. This has translated into automation engineers holding  design approaches close to their heart and controlling scripting tightly. Given this dynamic, the adoptions of test automation have remained low over the years.

Test Automation today has transitioned from a “Record and Playback” mode to a virtually “Scriptless” mode thus enabling rapid on the go Test Automation

It has resulted in enterprises automating testing to be oblivious to tool specific coding thus making automation suites maintainable and resource independent. However, scriptless automation frameworks still have many missing links. For example, most scriptless automation frameworks  demand extensive Business User involvement particularly to test the technology enablement. There is a possibility it takes longer than acceptable time to market. Among many causes for greater time to market, one cause is extensive manual testing of the solution. It hamstrings the time taken to market since there is heavy dependence on business analysts (from business or IT) in QA (test design and execution). There is a strong dependence on skilled & expensive technical resources for automation. There is a need to manage spikes in demand for QA resources which results in increase of QA costs.

Considering these dynamics, the next stage in the evolution of test automation is driving in the direction of Business Process Model based test automation that aims at synchronizing Operations, Product Management and Quality functions.

At Zen Test Labs we are innovating with multiple products in this space. Our flagship test automation framework, ZenFRAME is one such example. ZenFRAME improves BA and business testers productivity while reducing dependence on technology teams by up to 40%. The GUI enables most non-technical users to create automated test cases faster  thus resulting in close to 33% lesser creation time, read our whitepaper to know how you can implement a business Process model for you QA environment. Would love to hear thoughts from everyone…

Ravikiran Indore |Sr Consultant |Zen Test Labs

 

 

 

Top 6 solutions for software testing failures

The cost of software testing is still not valued by its worth. Although it is a critical investment companies avoid spending on testing because they don’t realize the ROI on testing and/or a quantifiable cost of quality. The most common complaints against testing that we repeatedly hear are:

  • It is a necessary evil that stalls a project the closer it gets to a release
  • It is too costly, time consuming without any guaranteed outcome
  • Many a times regression testing is not effective to identify new defects

Having worked on a number of testing projects over the past 12 years, I realize why there is a high tendency to look at testing with such a skeptical eye. I would like to share what we have learnt over time.The top six points in our view to improve the effectiveness of manual testing are:

6. Reducing effort and time in Test Documentation

A lot of teams spend unnecessary time detailing test scenarios during the planning phase which are rarely referred to after 2-3 rounds of testing. This increases maintenance overheads and reduces flexibility and coverage in the long run thus resulting in inefficient testing. Post the initial 6-8 months a large % of test scenarios are outdated and require the same effort in updating. Instead of detailing each and every step for every test scenario, one can cover it with test conditions and the expected results.

5. Focusing on breadth and depth of testing

Many a times when execution is not prioritized the depth of testing takes lead over breadth. By aiming at covering more breadth, we align testing with the business objectives. By doing this the teams aim at being effective first and then efficient. Breadth referring to covering positive  critical cases (across the application) that are frequently used by end user.Depth referring to covering all the test cases for a module.

4. Testing, a continuous activity

Many companies look at testing as a one-time investment. They outsource/ execute in-house once during the start of the development of the product and then rarely test it during the maintenance phases. The primary reason is invariably budget driven and goes onto harm the quality of the product when not tested after newer versions. For every minor release one should ensure all the regression test cases are executed and for every major release all the high and medium priority test cases are executed at least once.

3Remembering the objective of testing

The key objective of testing is to break the system and not to prove that the system works as per the requirements.This has a direct impact and can improve testing effectiveness and the number of defects one will find. It is often observed that many senior testers habitually start proving that system is working as per the requirements which is against the primary objective of testing.

2Strategize Test optimization

Coverage is important but not at cost of redundant test cases. Test optimization is an intelligent way to ensure test coverage in less time. That’s why testing teams need to collaborate more with the development teams. Understanding the high level design and structure of the application makes testing more effective. In development, one of the main principles followed is reuse. So, we can use the same principle while testing the same code which is reused. Why not optimize and test the class/object once and just test the implementation of the class/object on other screens/modules. If the test cases are reusable maintainable and scalable it is an additional advantage to roll out in time and under budget.

1. Focusing on the Business for which you are testing

Testing cannot be done in isolation. Business priorities and challenges are equally and in most of the cases more important than testing needs. One thing I have learnt is that testing cannot drive business decisions, business drives testing most of the times. Aligning testing to the business requirements results in a disciplined and ready to market high quality product.

These are some of the solutions with which I could overcome testing failures. Do share yours if you have new solutions or methods

Mukesh Mulchandani | CTO | ZenTest Labs