Software Quality, Development and Coding Standards…

The best applications are those that are not only coded properly but also easy to add, debug and maintain. The concept of ‘maintainable code’ is easy to contemplate about but difficult to practice. Developers code in specific and individualistic styles. Their styles of coding become their second nature and they continue to use that in everything they create. Such a style might include the conventions used to name variables and functions ($password, $Password or $pass_word for example). Any style should ensure that the team can read the code easily.

However, what happens when we start to code bigger projects and introduce additional people to help create a large application? Conflicts in the way you write your code will most definitely appear.

This is where the concept of ‘CODING STANDARDS’ comes into play.

Coding standards are very articulate and deeply formulated to be consistent and when developers follow these standards, it makes the end result more uniform, even if different parts of the application are written by different developers. Knowing these standards and the language is always easy, but the catch is in deciding which standard to apply when & where.

I have found that the entire process of testing & quality assurance becomes relatively simpler when developers have followed coding standards. This also goes a long way in improving the performance of the application. When coding standards have been adhered to it results in easy and quick grasping of what the application is supposed to do and what it is not supposed to. During maintenance phase, it undoubtedly, enhances readability which leads to better maintainability. By adhering to these standards testers do not feel disconnected or bowled over when they begin working with the application. I believe it’s even more relevant in the current scenario, when different processes of applications are built by different set of developers (internal teams, vendors, etc).

Some of the secure coding practices, I believe that are high priority:

  • Validate input data
  • Heed compiler warnings
  • Architect and design for security policies
  • Sanitize transferred data
  • Mitigate model threat
  • Checklist

I understand that it is not possible to apply all coding standards at all times, but if applied appropriately, it would enhance performance and reduce scientific misconduct. What are your views on coding standards and its impact on software testing?

Janhavi Hunnur | Marketing | Zen Test Labs